Ideas for teaching high school and middle school math. Innovative approaches that address the changing ways that today's student learns material.
 
Teachers can be inspired anywhere. This time it was a bar when I was playing team trivia with friends that inspired me. I leave this bit of information out when introducing the game to my students. I am secretly hoping that in the future (way future, I teach 7th and 8th graders) a student will notice the similarities in my version and the bar version.

Here are the rules: (Adapted from this site)

Team Trivia® is played in 3 rounds. Each round has three questions in different categories. The first round have point values available in five (5), three (3), and one (1). You can use these point values in any order and apply them to your answers, but you can only use each point value once per round. The 2nd and 3rd round have point values available is six (6), four (4), and two (2). Again, these values can only be used once in each round.

The bonus question typically will have unlimited correct answers, and each correct answer by the team will give them one (1) point for up to five (5) points. This is a great time to ask a open-ended question. In the document to the right, the question was write up to 5 equations (no more) of linear lines that are parallel to the line: y = 4x-12.

The final question is then asked and each team will wager up to their current score. I do plan on changing it to this policy: each team will wager a point value of up to 15 points. If a team answers the question correctly, it receives the number of points wagered. If a team’s answer is incorrect, the team will then have the wagered points subtracted from its previous total. A team may choose not to answer the final question or wager “zero” points and submit an answer. In either case, such team’s point total for the game would not change.

The Team Trivia® winner is the team with the most points at the conclusion of the final question. I handle ties by congratulating each team. It does not bother me if multiple teams win-they will survive. 

I sometimes will give the winning team(s) a few extra credit points on a quiz (never a test) and leave it at that. I do not give teenagers candy. I usually tell them their prize is pride and getting to play a game with their classmates. 

Have fun! I love this game. 
team_trivia_score_sheet.docx
File Size: 15 kb
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team_trivia_cards.docx
File Size: 13 kb
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team_trivia_work-out_sheets.docx
File Size: 40 kb
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decimal_team_trivia.pptx
File Size: 478 kb
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team_trivia_parallel_and_perpendicualr_lines.pptx
File Size: 418 kb
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02/13/2014 19:52

What a great idea! Although I have used Jeopardy and Hollywood squares, I haven't thought to modify the game we play at TGIFridays for my classroom. This will be a nice change of pace for final test review for the adult learners. However, they might figure out the model a little quicker than your high school students! Thank you for sharing!
Lynn Gartman

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Natalie Turbiville
02/14/2014 12:23

Yes, older students may figure out the source if inspiration!

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Ideas for teaching high school and middle school math. Innovative approaches that address the changing ways that today's student learns material.